Thousands of rare and hard-to-find films, TV movies and series on DVD and Blu-Ray discs and streaming Try it one month free!

Liked on Tumblr

More liked posts

Coming Soon to Blu-ray:

POSSESSED (1947) A married woman becomes obsessed with her ex-lover. Starring Joan Crawford, Van Heflin and Raymond Massey. 

Aspect Ratio: 1.37:1
Audio: DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 Mono
Subtitles: English SDH
Discs: One 50GB Blu-ray Disc
Run Time: 108 Minutes
B&W
Special Features: Commentary by Film Historian Drew Casper; Featurette: “Possessed: The Quintessential Film Noir”; Original Theatrical Trailer

Posted on Friday, September 19th 2014

Old San Francisco (1927)
Buildings shake and crumble. Rubble rains down, burying hapless victims. Flames rage throughout what was once the Paris of the Pacific. This stirring recreation of the earthquake of 1906 is the finale to Old San Francisco, but plenty happens before the famed sequence. Warner Oland (later one of the screen’s most memorable Charlie Chans) plays a cruel city boss, a Chinese disguised as an Occidental, who lusts after a gently bred daughter of the Spanish aristocracy (Dolores Costello). Set to a Vitaphone soundtrack with synchronized music and sound effects, the action careens from rancho to saloon to secret dungeon under the direction of Alan Crosland, who would make history later the same year (1927) with The Jazz Singer.

Old San Francisco (1927)

Buildings shake and crumble. Rubble rains down, burying hapless victims. Flames rage throughout what was once the Paris of the Pacific. This stirring recreation of the earthquake of 1906 is the finale to Old San Francisco, but plenty happens before the famed sequence. Warner Oland (later one of the screen’s most memorable Charlie Chans) plays a cruel city boss, a Chinese disguised as an Occidental, who lusts after a gently bred daughter of the Spanish aristocracy (Dolores Costello). Set to a Vitaphone soundtrack with synchronized music and sound effects, the action careens from rancho to saloon to secret dungeon under the direction of Alan Crosland, who would make history later the same year (1927) with The Jazz Singer.

Posted on Friday, September 12th 2014

Reblogged from A Modern Musketeer

YANKEE DOODLE DANDY (1942) - COMING SOON TO BLU-RAY!

Aspect Ratio: 1.37:1
Audio: DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 Mono
Subtitles: English SDH
Discs: One 50GB Blu-ray Disc
Run Time: 126 Minutes
B&W

Special Features: Leonard Maltin hosts Warner Night at the Movies 1942 with Casablanca trailer, 1942 newsreel, Warner Bros. short “Beyond the Call of Duty”, Warner Bros. vintage cartoon “Bugs Bunny Gets the Boid”; James Cagney in wartime short “You, John Jones”; Yankee Doodle Dandy theatrical trailer; Let Freedom Sing!: The Story of Yankee Doodle Dandy documentary; audio commentary with Warner Bros. historian Rudy Behlmer; “John Travolta remembers James Cagney” featurette; audio-only extras – radio show and pre-recording session outtakes/rehearsals; vintage Warner Bros. cartoon “Yankee Doodle Daffy”. *Note: animated cartoons presented in 1080p HD*

Posted on Thursday, September 11th 2014

doomsdaypicnic:

The Reckless Hour (1931)

"Apart from the light relief supplied by Joan Blondell, Ivan Simpson and Joe Donahue, The Reckless Hour was an ineptly made melodrama about a hapless, unworldly girl who falls for a lying cad whose promises of happiness are as false as he is, and who, ultimately, is rescued from total ruin by a kindly artist in a happy-ever-after ending. 

Written by Florence Ryerson and Robert Lord from a story by Arthur Richman, and directed by John Francis Dillon, its cast was headed by Dorothy Mackaill, Conrad Nagel (as the artist) and Walter Byron (as the cad). H.B. Warner was the heroine’s father.”

- From The Warner Brothers Story by Clive “Crankypants” Hirschhorn

Yes, another downer of a review for a perfectly serviceable potboiler. Former Ziegfeld girl Dorothy Mackaill is a little stiff at times, and she’s carried over a few mannerisms from the silent era that don’t quite fit in the talkies, but she’s a decent actress and has a fragile quality that helps sell an otherwise unsympathetic character. The review isn’t quite right in calling her “hapless” and “unworldly”; although she’s not as canny as her brassy sister (played by a show-stealing Joan Blondell), she’s a model at a fancy clothes shop and has clearly had some practice at brushing off unwelcome advances. She’s a little immature, which is at least partly due to her ambitious mother, who is unconcerned about her daughter’s flexible morality as long as it bags her a rich husband; and also her decent, loving, but passive and inattentive father, played with warmth and dignity by HB Warner. 

The real weakness is the artist character played by Conrad Nagel, who doesn’t really seem like a huge improvement on the cad who abandons her. He’s recently separated from his wife, and has sworn off women, but as soon as he sees Dorothy Mackaill he starts leering at her in a most unpleasant fashion. It doesn’t help that he has weird eyebrows. 

All in all, though, it’s a brisk little picture that doesn’t stick around to wallow in misery for very long before racing to its happy (ish) conclusion. The direction by John Francis Dillon is competent if uninspired, and although the story is light on surprises, it’s dramatically and morally coherent, and as a pre-code film is fairly frank about premarital sex, divorce, pregnancy, infant death and something that comes very close to what could be politely described as concubinage. 

The Reckless Hour is only available from Warner Archive, who say they haven’t digitally restored it, but the print looks and sounds fantastic anyway. It’s available as part of a burn-to-order Dorothy Mackaill double feature which also includes Adventures in Africa (1930), which I haven’t seen yet but looks like a fun musical.

Posted on Friday, September 5th 2014

Reblogged from Doomsdaypicnic

Eddie Muller Interview on Out of the Past - Warner Archive Podcast

filmnoirfoundation:

You ready for Eddie??? You should be!! Check this out! The filmnoirfoundation's VERY OWN "Czar of Noir" Eddie Muller is hanging out with the always awesome George Feltenstein at warnerarchive and chatting about the brand-new gorgeous blu-ray of OUT OF THE PAST (have you gotten your copy yet?)

Check this podcast out!

Posted on Friday, September 5th 2014

Reblogged from Film Noir Foundation

Silent Movie Time Capsule: Silent stars share their best performances

moviessilently:

Silent Movie Time Capsule: Silent stars share their best performances

What would happen if you asked a room full of silent movie stars to share what they consider to be their best performance and film? Well, that’s exactly what Motion Picture Magazine did in 1926.

favorite roles 1

favorite roles 2

You know what I found the most interesting about this article? How many of these films still exist (and have received home video release!) and how well the films have held up. Let’s do a breakdown.

John…

View On WordPress

Posted on Friday, September 5th 2014

Reblogged from Movies Silently

Fun Size Review: The Red Lily (1924)

moviessilently:

Fun Size Review: The Red Lily (1924)

red lily

Ramon Novarro and Enid Bennett– both best remembered for their unabashedly heroic roles– take a dip into some very dark waters with this Parisian drama. It’s all about an innocent young couple who are separated and slip into lives of crime, degradation, depression and hatred. If it sounds depressing, it is. However, it is also skillfully made (the gloom and decay are gloriously shot and the…

View On WordPress

Posted on Thursday, August 28th 2014

Reblogged from Movies Silently