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Employee’s Entrace (1933)

"Directed by Roy Del Ruth from a screenplay by Robert Presnell (based on a play by David Boehm), as a dictatorial department-store manager, whose utter ruthlessness in his public as well as his private life elicited both admiration and contempt from his colleagues. Stopping at nothing to get what he wants, be it promotion at double the salary, or another man’s wife, he eventually gets his much-deserved comeuppance and the spectacle was joyful to behold. Equally joyful was William’s vivace performance, with good work too from Loretta Young as the married woman he falls for, and Alice White as a blonde flirt. Also cast were Wallace Ford, Albert Gran, Allen Jenkins, Marjorie Gateson, Hale Hamilton and Ruth Donnelly. Lucien Hubbard supervised.”

- From The Warner Bros. Story by Clive Hirschhorn

It tells you something about how enjoyable a film is when even the dyspeptic Clive “I hate everything” Hirschhorn can’t find it in himself to say a bad word about it. Employee Entrance’s main attraction is Warren William, usually cast as a suave, debonair man of the world full of easy charm and sang-froid, playing against type as Kurt Anderson, a filnty-hearted small-time tyrant (the scale of his tyrannical ambition is underscored by a cutaway to a bust of Napoleon on his shelf). Loretta Young is absolutely adorable, and Alice White is fantastic as Polly Dale, an ambitious and morally flexible blonde whose charms are employed by Anderson to keep his assistant manager off his back.

Employee’s Entrance would have been a fun watch as a by-the-books studio system programme filler, but an excellent, often very funny screenplay and the considerable talents of veteran director Roy Del Ruth (On Moonlight Bay (1951), Du Barry was a Lady (1943), Broadway Rhythm (1944)) gives the project oodles of energy and somehow imbues the squabbling of a department store board of directors with something like the grandeur and moral gravity of an Elizabethan tragedy. 

Employee’s Entrance is exclusively available from Warner Archive as part of their Forbidden Hollywood Collection: Volume 7. Also included are pre-code crackers The Hatchet Man (1932, starring Edward G. Robinson as a Chinese (!) assassin) Skyscraper Souls (1932, also featuring Warren William) and Ex-Lady (1933, with Bette Davis). 

Now in HD on Warner Archive Instant - try it free for a month

Posted on Wednesday, August 20th 2014

Reblogged from Doomsdaypicnic

Classic Flicks, Private Dicks & Teen Sidekicks

Warner Archive Podcast, August 12, 2014

Warner Archive Podcast

Classic Flicks, Private Dicks & Teen Sidekicks - August 12, 2014

Jacques Tourneur’s noir masterpiece Out of the Past (1947) starring Robert Mitchum and DC Animation’s Young Justice: Season One (2011-12) lead the pack this week with sparkling new Blu-ray discs. Then we follow those up with six new DVDs from producer Samuel Goldwyn including Raffles Double Feature (1930 & 1939) starring Ronald Colman followed by David Niven, They Shall Have Music (1939) with Jascha Heifetz, the silent The Winning Of Barbara Worth (1926) and The Adventures Of Marco Polo (1938) both starring Gary Cooper, Sinclair Lewis’ Arrowsmith (1931) and the heart-breaking romance Enchantment (1948).

All Podcasts also available on iTunes.

You can find new releases on disc at the Warner Archive Shop and/or streaming on Warner Archive Instant

Posted on Tuesday, August 12th 2014

Classic Comedy & Future Worries

Warner Archive Podcast, August 5, 2014

Warner Archive Podcast

Classic Comedy & Future Worries - August 5, 2014

First up, we discuss the DVD releases of two contemporary TV series, Almost Human (2013-14) a sci-fi cop show with Karl Urban followed by the gritty cop drama Golden Boy (2013) starring Theo James. Then we chat about the Big Mouth himself, Joe E. Brown and his five new releases including Broad Minded (1931) with Bela Lugosi, Local Boy Makes Good (1931), You Said a Mouthful (1932), Elmer, the Great (1933) and A Very Honorable Guy (1934).

All Podcasts also available on iTunes.

You can find new releases on disc at the Warner Archive Shop and/or streaming on Warner Archive Instant

Posted on Tuesday, August 5th 2014

BRONCO: THE COMPLETE FIRST SEASON (1958-59) Ex-Confederate Officer Bronco Layne (Ty Hardin) rides back to the Texas Panhandle only to discover his home — and his honor — are now lost to him. And so Bronco wanders the West, armed with a lightning draw and thunder in his fists, fighting for the justice he was denied. Initially filling in for Clint Walker on Cheyenne, the “Texas twister” proved a quick hit with viewers, alternating adventures with Will Hutchins’ Sugarfoot. “Cheyenne starring Ty Hardin as Bronco Layne” might have been a mouthful but, thankfully, Bronco came complete with his own catchy theme song. This 5-Disc, 20-Episode collection sees Bronco defend besieged settlers, uncover fatal locomotive sabotage, tackle the mystery of a man frozen inside a glacier, and sail the prairie with a landlocked Navy officer (Lorne Greene). Sharing the sagebrush with Bronco are notable guests the likes of Wayne Morris, Jack Elam, James Coburn, Robert Vaughn and Troy Donahue.

BRONCO: THE COMPLETE FIRST SEASON (1958-59) 
Ex-Confederate Officer Bronco Layne (Ty Hardin) rides back to the Texas Panhandle only to discover his home — and his honor — are now lost to him. And so Bronco wanders the West, armed with a lightning draw and thunder in his fists, fighting for the justice he was denied. Initially filling in for Clint Walker on Cheyenne, the “Texas twister” proved a quick hit with viewers, alternating adventures with Will Hutchins’ Sugarfoot. “Cheyenne starring Ty Hardin as Bronco Layne” might have been a mouthful but, thankfully, Bronco came complete with his own catchy theme song. This 5-Disc, 20-Episode collection sees Bronco defend besieged settlers, uncover fatal locomotive sabotage, tackle the mystery of a man frozen inside a glacier, and sail the prairie with a landlocked Navy officer (Lorne Greene). Sharing the sagebrush with Bronco are notable guests the likes of Wayne Morris, Jack Elam, James Coburn, Robert Vaughn and Troy Donahue.

Posted on Monday, August 4th 2014

WIZARDS AND WARRIORS: THE COMPLETE SERIES (1983) TV’s first real foray into the realm of high fantasy was a truly ahead of its time combination of awesome adventure and witty self-awareness. Prolific sitcom writer Don Reo (The John Larroquette Show, Two and a Half Men) had a different vision in mind than previous grim and gritty attempts at the genre as seen in cinema — a vision underscored by the show’s own opening titles, which frame the action as comic book panels. Jeff Conaway (Taxi, Babylon 5) stars as valiant Prince Erik Greystone who, along with his strongman sidekick pal Marko (Walter Olkewicz), battles evil Prince Dirk Blackpool (Duncan Regehr, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine) and malevolent magic-user Vector (Clive Revill) for control of the continent of Aperans, his country of Camarand and for the hand of fair, spoiled and leather pants-obsessed Princess Ariel (Julia Duffy, Newhart). Now the time has come to heed the call of adventure — and comedy!
 
WIZARDS AND WARRIORS: THE COMPLETE SERIES (1983) 
TV’s first real foray into the realm of high fantasy was a truly ahead of its time combination of awesome adventure and witty self-awareness. Prolific sitcom writer Don Reo (The John Larroquette Show, Two and a Half Men) had a different vision in mind than previous grim and gritty attempts at the genre as seen in cinema — a vision underscored by the show’s own opening titles, which frame the action as comic book panels. Jeff Conaway (Taxi, Babylon 5) stars as valiant Prince Erik Greystone who, along with his strongman sidekick pal Marko (Walter Olkewicz), battles evil Prince Dirk Blackpool (Duncan Regehr, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine) and malevolent magic-user Vector (Clive Revill) for control of the continent of Aperans, his country of Camarand and for the hand of fair, spoiled and leather pants-obsessed Princess Ariel (Julia Duffy, Newhart). Now the time has come to heed the call of adventure — and comedy!

 

Posted on Sunday, August 3rd 2014

THE WHITE TOWER (1950)
An unconquered mountain provides the fulcrum for this existential ensemble drama that pits a group of desperate people against the icy summit, each other and themselves. What drives the woman determined to conquer the slopes that killed her father (Valli), her guide (Oskar Homolka), her father’s friend (Cedric Hardwicke), a wannabe Übermensch (Lloyd Bridges), a dipsomaniacal writer (Claude Rains) and a burnt-out World War II vet (Glenn Ford) to push themselves to the top? As the needs of the many collide with the arrogance and weakness of the few, the mountain’s lessons become ever deadlier. Final script penned by Paul Jarrico for the studios before HUAC sent him overseas, adapted from the novel by James Ramsey Ullman. Directed by Ted Tetzlaff.

THE WHITE TOWER (1950)

An unconquered mountain provides the fulcrum for this existential ensemble drama that pits a group of desperate people against the icy summit, each other and themselves. What drives the woman determined to conquer the slopes that killed her father (Valli), her guide (Oskar Homolka), her father’s friend (Cedric Hardwicke), a wannabe Übermensch (Lloyd Bridges), a dipsomaniacal writer (Claude Rains) and a burnt-out World War II vet (Glenn Ford) to push themselves to the top? As the needs of the many collide with the arrogance and weakness of the few, the mountain’s lessons become ever deadlier. Final script penned by Paul Jarrico for the studios before HUAC sent him overseas, adapted from the novel by James Ramsey Ullman. Directed by Ted Tetzlaff.

Posted on Saturday, August 2nd 2014