Thousands of rare and hard-to-find films, TV movies and series on DVD and Blu-Ray discs and streaming Try it one month free!

Liked on Tumblr

More liked posts

Yankee Doodle Blu or Die

Warner Archive Podcast, 10-14-14

Warner Archive Podcast
Yankee Doodle Blu or Die
October 14, 2014

It’s Cag-tober with Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942) starring James Cagney on Blu-ray along with new DVDs of St. Louis Kid (1934) with Allen Jenkins and Devil Dogs of the Air (1935), The Irish in Us (1935) and Boy Meets Girl (1938) all co-starring Pat O’Brien. Then we move onto the second season of Bronco (1959-60) starring Ty Hardin and finish off with two DVDs back in print, Best Foot Forward (1943) starring Lucille Ball and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1960) with Tony Randall.

All Podcasts also available on iTunes.

You can find new releases on disc at the Warner Archive Shop and/or streaming on Warner Archive Instant

Posted on Tuesday, October 14th 2014

Coming Soon to Blu-ray:

POSSESSED (1947) A married woman becomes obsessed with her ex-lover. Starring Joan Crawford, Van Heflin and Raymond Massey. 

Aspect Ratio: 1.37:1
Audio: DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 Mono
Subtitles: English SDH
Discs: One 50GB Blu-ray Disc
Run Time: 108 Minutes
B&W
Special Features: Commentary by Film Historian Drew Casper; Featurette: “Possessed: The Quintessential Film Noir”; Original Theatrical Trailer

Posted on Friday, September 19th 2014

doomsdaypicnic:

The Reckless Hour (1931)

"Apart from the light relief supplied by Joan Blondell, Ivan Simpson and Joe Donahue, The Reckless Hour was an ineptly made melodrama about a hapless, unworldly girl who falls for a lying cad whose promises of happiness are as false as he is, and who, ultimately, is rescued from total ruin by a kindly artist in a happy-ever-after ending. 

Written by Florence Ryerson and Robert Lord from a story by Arthur Richman, and directed by John Francis Dillon, its cast was headed by Dorothy Mackaill, Conrad Nagel (as the artist) and Walter Byron (as the cad). H.B. Warner was the heroine’s father.”

- From The Warner Brothers Story by Clive “Crankypants” Hirschhorn

Yes, another downer of a review for a perfectly serviceable potboiler. Former Ziegfeld girl Dorothy Mackaill is a little stiff at times, and she’s carried over a few mannerisms from the silent era that don’t quite fit in the talkies, but she’s a decent actress and has a fragile quality that helps sell an otherwise unsympathetic character. The review isn’t quite right in calling her “hapless” and “unworldly”; although she’s not as canny as her brassy sister (played by a show-stealing Joan Blondell), she’s a model at a fancy clothes shop and has clearly had some practice at brushing off unwelcome advances. She’s a little immature, which is at least partly due to her ambitious mother, who is unconcerned about her daughter’s flexible morality as long as it bags her a rich husband; and also her decent, loving, but passive and inattentive father, played with warmth and dignity by HB Warner. 

The real weakness is the artist character played by Conrad Nagel, who doesn’t really seem like a huge improvement on the cad who abandons her. He’s recently separated from his wife, and has sworn off women, but as soon as he sees Dorothy Mackaill he starts leering at her in a most unpleasant fashion. It doesn’t help that he has weird eyebrows. 

All in all, though, it’s a brisk little picture that doesn’t stick around to wallow in misery for very long before racing to its happy (ish) conclusion. The direction by John Francis Dillon is competent if uninspired, and although the story is light on surprises, it’s dramatically and morally coherent, and as a pre-code film is fairly frank about premarital sex, divorce, pregnancy, infant death and something that comes very close to what could be politely described as concubinage. 

The Reckless Hour is only available from Warner Archive, who say they haven’t digitally restored it, but the print looks and sounds fantastic anyway. It’s available as part of a burn-to-order Dorothy Mackaill double feature which also includes Adventures in Africa (1930), which I haven’t seen yet but looks like a fun musical.

Posted on Friday, September 5th 2014

Reblogged from Doomsdaypicnic

doomsdaypicnic:

Employee’s Entrace (1933)

"Directed by Roy Del Ruth from a screenplay by Robert Presnell (based on a play by David Boehm), as a dictatorial department-store manager, whose utter ruthlessness in his public as well as his private life elicited both admiration and contempt from his colleagues. Stopping at nothing to get what he wants, be it promotion at double the salary, or another man’s wife, he eventually gets his much-deserved comeuppance and the spectacle was joyful to behold. Equally joyful was William’s vivace performance, with good work too from Loretta Young as the married woman he falls for, and Alice White as a blonde flirt. Also cast were Wallace Ford, Albert Gran, Allen Jenkins, Marjorie Gateson, Hale Hamilton and Ruth Donnelly. Lucien Hubbard supervised.”

- From The Warner Bros. Story by Clive Hirschhorn

It tells you something about how enjoyable a film is when even the dyspeptic Clive “I hate everything” Hirschhorn can’t find it in himself to say a bad word about it. Employee Entrance’s main attraction is Warren William, usually cast as a suave, debonair man of the world full of easy charm and sang-froid, playing against type as Kurt Anderson, a filnty-hearted small-time tyrant (the scale of his tyrannical ambition is underscored by a cutaway to a bust of Napoleon on his shelf). Loretta Young is absolutely adorable, and Alice White is fantastic as Polly Dale, an ambitious and morally flexible blonde whose charms are employed by Anderson to keep his assistant manager off his back.

Employee’s Entrance would have been a fun watch as a by-the-books studio system programme filler, but an excellent, often very funny screenplay and the considerable talents of veteran director Roy Del Ruth (On Moonlight Bay (1951), Du Barry was a Lady (1943), Broadway Rhythm (1944)) gives the project oodles of energy and somehow imbues the squabbling of a department store board of directors with something like the grandeur and moral gravity of an Elizabethan tragedy. 

Employee’s Entrance is exclusively available from Warner Archive as part of their Forbidden Hollywood Collection: Volume 7. Also included are pre-code crackers The Hatchet Man (1932, starring Edward G. Robinson as a Chinese (!) assassin) Skyscraper Souls (1932, also featuring Warren William) and Ex-Lady (1933, with Bette Davis). 

Now in HD on Warner Archive Instant - try it free for a month

Posted on Wednesday, August 20th 2014

Reblogged from Doomsdaypicnic

Classic Flicks, Private Dicks & Teen Sidekicks

Warner Archive Podcast, August 12, 2014

Warner Archive Podcast

Classic Flicks, Private Dicks & Teen Sidekicks - August 12, 2014

Jacques Tourneur’s noir masterpiece Out of the Past (1947) starring Robert Mitchum and DC Animation’s Young Justice: Season One (2011-12) lead the pack this week with sparkling new Blu-ray discs. Then we follow those up with six new DVDs from producer Samuel Goldwyn including Raffles Double Feature (1930 & 1939) starring Ronald Colman followed by David Niven, They Shall Have Music (1939) with Jascha Heifetz, the silent The Winning Of Barbara Worth (1926) and The Adventures Of Marco Polo (1938) both starring Gary Cooper, Sinclair Lewis’ Arrowsmith (1931) and the heart-breaking romance Enchantment (1948).

All Podcasts also available on iTunes.

You can find new releases on disc at the Warner Archive Shop and/or streaming on Warner Archive Instant

Posted on Tuesday, August 12th 2014

Classic Comedy & Future Worries

Warner Archive Podcast, August 5, 2014

Warner Archive Podcast

Classic Comedy & Future Worries - August 5, 2014

First up, we discuss the DVD releases of two contemporary TV series, Almost Human (2013-14) a sci-fi cop show with Karl Urban followed by the gritty cop drama Golden Boy (2013) starring Theo James. Then we chat about the Big Mouth himself, Joe E. Brown and his five new releases including Broad Minded (1931) with Bela Lugosi, Local Boy Makes Good (1931), You Said a Mouthful (1932), Elmer, the Great (1933) and A Very Honorable Guy (1934).

All Podcasts also available on iTunes.

You can find new releases on disc at the Warner Archive Shop and/or streaming on Warner Archive Instant

Posted on Tuesday, August 5th 2014

BRONCO: THE COMPLETE FIRST SEASON (1958-59) Ex-Confederate Officer Bronco Layne (Ty Hardin) rides back to the Texas Panhandle only to discover his home — and his honor — are now lost to him. And so Bronco wanders the West, armed with a lightning draw and thunder in his fists, fighting for the justice he was denied. Initially filling in for Clint Walker on Cheyenne, the “Texas twister” proved a quick hit with viewers, alternating adventures with Will Hutchins’ Sugarfoot. “Cheyenne starring Ty Hardin as Bronco Layne” might have been a mouthful but, thankfully, Bronco came complete with his own catchy theme song. This 5-Disc, 20-Episode collection sees Bronco defend besieged settlers, uncover fatal locomotive sabotage, tackle the mystery of a man frozen inside a glacier, and sail the prairie with a landlocked Navy officer (Lorne Greene). Sharing the sagebrush with Bronco are notable guests the likes of Wayne Morris, Jack Elam, James Coburn, Robert Vaughn and Troy Donahue.

BRONCO: THE COMPLETE FIRST SEASON (1958-59) 
Ex-Confederate Officer Bronco Layne (Ty Hardin) rides back to the Texas Panhandle only to discover his home — and his honor — are now lost to him. And so Bronco wanders the West, armed with a lightning draw and thunder in his fists, fighting for the justice he was denied. Initially filling in for Clint Walker on Cheyenne, the “Texas twister” proved a quick hit with viewers, alternating adventures with Will Hutchins’ Sugarfoot. “Cheyenne starring Ty Hardin as Bronco Layne” might have been a mouthful but, thankfully, Bronco came complete with his own catchy theme song. This 5-Disc, 20-Episode collection sees Bronco defend besieged settlers, uncover fatal locomotive sabotage, tackle the mystery of a man frozen inside a glacier, and sail the prairie with a landlocked Navy officer (Lorne Greene). Sharing the sagebrush with Bronco are notable guests the likes of Wayne Morris, Jack Elam, James Coburn, Robert Vaughn and Troy Donahue.

Posted on Monday, August 4th 2014